Freezing Kohlrabi

I had a bumper crop of kohlrabi—the Vegetable from Outer space. Not only did I have the kohlrabi from my front 40 feet. I also had the kohlrabi that I gleaned (scavenged) from the village compost site! After eating as much as we want the rest will be frozen for later use in soup, stew, and as vegetable side dish.

Because of its slightly wilted condition, I decided to freeze the giant purple kohlrabi I picked up at the composting site first. We are eating the kohlrabi I grew from seed fresh. Now that it has been nipped by frost, it is so sweet and wonderful we can’t wait to eat it!

Most vegetables need to be cooked slightly before being frozen. The latest edition of the Ball Blue Book (an unfortunate title for the bible of safe canning and freezing) didn’t have kohlrabi listed. I decided to blanch it for 4 minutes and bag it up for freezing in the portions I would use in soup.

Blanching and freezing vegetables is very easy:

1.       Bring 10 to 12 cups of blanching water to a rolling boil.

2.       Rinse your kohlrabi and trim off the top and bottom. Cut the rest of the fibrous outer layer of the enlarged stem until you have only the tender center.

3.       Cut the bulb into thick sticks and then cubes.

4.       Measure out one or two cups of cubed kohlrabi and dump into the boiling water. (I use a sieve to make transfers faster.)

5.       Set timer for 4 minutes and run a large bowl of cold water and add two trays of ice cubes.

6.       Remove kohlrabi from the boiling water and into a sieve and submerge vegetables in the ice water bath. (This will stop the cooking quickly so you don’t end up with a mushy end product.)

7.       When the kohlrabi feels cold, drain and pack into dated freezer containers or zip-top freezer bags, squeezing as much air out of the bags as possible.

8.       Lay the bags flat on a cookie sheet and freeze.

Continue this process until you run out of kohlrabi or freezer space! Begonia

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